Barrel Chests, Brawn, and Buffoonery: Controlling Images of Masculinity in Pixar Movies

September 17, 2014 6:13 PM

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Barrel Chests, Brawn, and Buffoonery: Controlling Images of Masculinity in Pixar Movies

I just read and reviewed Shannon Wooden and Ken Gillam's Pixar's Boy Stories: Masculinity in a Postmodern Age. And I thought I'd build on some of a piece of their critique of a pattern in the Pixar canon to do with portrayals of masculine embodiment. In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins coined the term "controlling images" to analyze how cultural stereotypes surrounding specific groups ossify in the form of cultural images and symbols that work to (re)situate those groups within social hierarchies. Controlling images work in ways that produce a "truth" about that group (regardless of its actual veracity). Collins was particularly interested in the controlling images of black women and argues that those images play a fundamental role in black women's continued oppression. While the concept of "controlling images" is largely applied to popular portrayals of disadvantaged groups, in this post, I'm considering how the concept applies to a consideration of the controlling images of a historically privileged group. How do controlling images of dominant groups work in ways that shore up existing relations of power and inequality when we consider portrayals of dominant groups?

Pixar films have been popularly hailed as pushing back against some of the heteronormative gender conformity that is widely understood as characterizing the Disney collection. While a woman didn't occupy the lead protagonist role until Brave (2012), the girls and women in Pixar movies seem more comp...

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