Antikythera Mechanism, World’s Oldest Computer is Even Older

November 29, 2014 4:05 PM

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The world’s oldest computer Antikythera Mechanism is older than what it was previously thought to be. Antikythera Mechanism was first found in 1991 in the shipwreck near the island of Antikythera in the Aegan Sea. It is also popularly known as the astronomical calculator since it is able to accurately predict lunar and solar eclipses, as well as positions of the moon, sun and other planets. It even calculated and predicted dates. Some experts call it the first analog computer. In the past researchers believed that Antikythera Mechanism, which is made up of a complex clocklike assembly of bronze gears and display dials, was influenced by Greek mathematics and scholars like Archimedes, Posidonious and Hipparchus. But some historians and archeologist have always debated that fact. The device is believed to have been boxed in a wooden box and operated with hand cranks. The devices also bear inscriptions on the front and the back. Researchers believed that the device came from 87 BC. But according to a new study it is believed that the device actually came from 205 BC, which is more than 100 years before it was thought to exist and seven years after Archimedes died. Christián C. Carman, a science historian at the National University of Quilmes in Argentina, and James Evans, a physicist at the University of Puget Sound in Washington, were the lead researchers of these findings, which were published in journal Archive for History of Exact Sciences. They studied the device’s eclipse patterns and using the process of elimination reached to its starting time. The researchers found that the device was not based on the Greek trigonometry but Babylonian arithmetical methods which were later borrowed by the Greeks. This makes it hard to connect the device with Archimedes. Dr Evans said, “We know so little about ancient Greek astronomy. Only small fragments of work have survived. It’s probably safer not to try to hang it on any one particular famous person.” The device has been the source of many books, replicas and computer simulations, with a growing number of Greek Scholars, archaeologists, astronomers and historians trying to unravel its secrets. Last fall an expedition led by Woods Hole and Greek Government scientists began an investigation on the shipwreck where the device was first found. The scientists intend to continue searching that place for more clues. About the Author About Seth CharltonSeth work as an Editor for Voice Chronicle. Having an experience of over 7 years in writing news, he is well eligible to proof-read all types of content. He is an avid reader too. Seth's email is [email protected]

Antikythera Mechanism was first found in 1991 in the shipwreck near the island of Antikythera in the Aegan Sea. It is also popularly known as the astronomical calculator since it is able to accurately predict lunar and solar eclipses, as well as positions of the moon, sun and other planets. It even ...

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